Categories
Blog Color Management Media

Free Color Correction Will Make You Hungry

As an introduction to HiDefColor.com, I am offering free color correction services to trigger emotional responses to your print/web marketing production.

Drop me a note to take advantage of this free color service and improve your marketing effectiveness.

For a visual comparison:

George Mokbel Everyday Gourmet Plate
Original image in camera raw format.
George Mokbel Everyday Gourmet Plate
Same image with HiDefColor correction free service.

Which dish would you order?

Categories
SEO

10 Google Search Tips You May Not Know

There is no question Google has changed our lives and especially how business is conducted today. Every business has a goal to be listed on the first page of a Google search. Granted every company can not obtain these results, but choosing the appropriate keywords, more importantly long-tail keywords, can level the playing field for smaller companies to compete with the big boys. With the explosion of mobile marketing about to happen, the ability to utilize Google is paramount to success.

Unless you are a tech-head, you may be using Google in its simplest form. You may make a query with a few words and keep searching until you find exactly what you’re looking for. I will share with you these tips to save you time and narrow down exactly what you want.

 

  1. Be Specific: use double quotes [“UV soft touch coating“] to narrow down results
  2. Exclude Words: use minus sign directly in front of keyword you want removed from search results [soft touch coating -plastic]
  3. Avoid “stop” words: do not use the words ‘the,’ ‘a,’ ‘for,’ ‘it,’ and ‘on’ and other articles. They will throw off search results as they are found within longer words and have little relevance to keywords. Enlarge picture above for demonstration.
  4. Search within a specific site: use the ‘site:’ to search a specific site. [brochures site:hidefcolor.com]
  5. Specific File Formats: use ‘filetype:’ to search for documents with a specific file format. [“online printing” filetype:pdf]
  6. Phone Listing: don’t recognize incoming phone call? Use ‘phonebook:’ to look up phone number. [phonebook:800-555-1212]
  7. Numeric Ranges: use ‘..’ between two numbers to get range of data between the two numbers. [United States President 1920..1930]
  8. Word Definition: use ‘define:’ to get definition of words. [define:paradox]
  9. Synonyms and Similar Words: use ‘~’ directly in front of words that you want similar results for.
  10. This OR That: use the ‘OR’ operator to match one or more terms. The ‘OR’ operator must be capitalized. [online printing OR lithography]

 

With the seamless transition of phones, tablets and computers, the significance of successful searching will be a key ingredient in building your business. Smartphones are computers opening up a significant opportunity to marketers to get found online. Mobile marketing is a perfect opportunity to develop leads by providing quick, precise information on what they’re searching.

Understanding how search engines work is paramount to getting found in search results.

What are your favorite Google search tips?

 

Categories
Blog Printing Video

VIDEO: 3D Printing May Solve Organ Donor Crisis

 

Where will printing take us next? The future of print is brighter than some may think.

3D Printing is a new and exciting development in the world of inkjet technology. It works on the premise of printing 3D models layer by layer; akin to layer cake.

In the case of creating human organs, the sequence of layers is derived from MRI scans ensuring the exact dimensions of the replacement organ. The human cells are harvested form the recipient and stored in an ‘oven’ that replicates the environment of the human body, from temperature to oxygen levels. The living cells are then ‘printed’ with the data from the MRI scan. Instead of printing with ink, the printer is printing with human cells. Truly fascinating!

So the question needs to be asked, can we grow organs instead of transplanting them?

Categories
Blog Color Management Featured Article Media Video

VIDEO: How RGB Color is Converted to CMYK in Photoshop

I have been asked the question many times before: why does my photography/image look so flat when i convert RGB to CMYK color?

Well, the answer is science.

RGB is additive color theory. Red, green and blue light when combined produce white light. When red, green and blue light are turned off, there is no color therefore resulting in black. This is how your monitor and television function.

CMYK is subtractive color theory. Cyan, magenta and yellow ink act as filters to absorb and reflect light that is reflected off paper. When light reflects off paper where no ink is applied, this is white. When light reflects where all three colors are present, no light reflects back resulting in black. Cyan ink absorbs red light; magenta absorbs green light; and yellow absorbs blue light. This is the basic theory of subtractive color.

It’s important to note that a fourth ink (black) is used to create more contrast and deeper blacks/shadows in images. The amount of black ink is dependent on the conversion process that is used, for example medium GCR (Gray Component Replacement).

RGB color uses projected light which is much more brighter than light reflecting off a substrate with CMYK color. The additive light (RGB) creates a color gamut that is much larger than subtractive (CMYK) color gamut.

Does this explain RGB to CMYK conversion for you? Please place your comments below…

[learn_more caption=”Transcript of Video” state=”open”]

Hi. This is Rick Rys from HiDefColor.com. Today we are going to discuss the conversion from the RGB color space into the CMYK color space.

[0:14] RGB is an additive color space meaning that red, green, and blue light together will create white. When red, green, and blue light are off, they will be black when it is projected onto screen, or onto a monitor.

[0:31] CMYK is the subtractive color theory meaning that the cyan, magenta, and yellow inks act as filters. As light bounces off of the paper, it reflects up through the cyan, magenta, and yellow inks, which in turn will either absorb or reflect different color wavelengths.

[0:52] The opposite of red is cyan, the opposite of green is magenta, and the opposite of blue is yellow. The subtractive colors are the gray components of the additive colors meaning that when they’re put together, they create gray, or black, or white.

[1:07] The LAB color model–let me turn this off here–is a 3-axis color system, and the LAB colors are absolute meaning that the color is identical. It’s across what’s called a device-independent, meaning that the LAB color space is the only way for you to communicate different colors across different devices.

[1:35] Now, it is a 3-axis system. The first axis, the L-channel, or lightness goes up and down the 3-D color model, and it consists of white to black, and all of your gray colors will be exactly right down the center.

[1:49] All your neutral colors will be relatively in the center of this axis. The A-axis goes from a cyan/blue color across to a magenta/red color, and the B-axis goes from blue to yellow.

[2:07] Within this area, we’re going to plot our visual or reproducible colors based on the gamut or the profile of the device we have. I’m going to turn on the sRGB color profile. Most monitors display in sRGB; sRGB is preferred for any type of Internet or Web application.

[2:27] And look at this thing spinning here. And you can see the volume of the colors that you can reproduce from this additive color model. Obviously, since it’s dealing with projecting light, they’re very bright colors and they’re very saturated.

[2:44] Now when we bring in and display the CMYK GRACoL color profile, you’ll notice when I turn it on the sRGB encompasses the whole CMYK color gamut beside this area of cyan and greens through here.

[3:03] If you look down on the color model, you’ll notice that the circumference of the model is projected along the bottom here. You can see the outside perimeter of the sRGB color profile.

[3:17] The brighter colors are just not capable of being reproduced with the CMYK color gamut. You can see what happens when you get these real dark blues. There’s no blue for you to hit in a CMYK color model.

[3:30] What I’m going to do is I’m going to take our sRGB color profile, and I changed the opacity, so you can see the difference that we’re dealing with here. As you can see the volume of color on the RGB color profile is nowhere near what can be reproduced in a CMYK color profile.

[3:53] So what we have to do is we have to do our best job of remapping these colors, or what is known as tonal compression, to bring this sRGB color model into the CMYK color space.

[4:06] This is why–I’ll stop right here–when you look at a blue sky, you may always be disappointed with the results you get because when the photograph is in RGB, you’ve got all these deep bright blues and more of the colors you see in the horizon.

[4:30] When they’re converted to CMYK – you’ll notice when I change opacity, all those bright blues have to be condensed into this little area here of the blue hue that’s reproducible in CMYK.

[4:42] There’s a sacrifice there, and that’s where you get into using either relative rendering intent, or the perceptual color intent. That will help you resolve some of issues you have with converting your dark blues into the CMYK color space.

[4:58] Let’s turn this opacity back up, and you’ll get an idea, again, of what we’re dealing with here. We need to take all of this color and condense it into this little area right here.

[5:12] And this is the GRACoL color profile. The GRACoL color profile has more colors than the SWOP profile, so we’re going to get a better representation of some of those more juicier RGB colors when they’re converted to CMYK.

[5:27] So let’s bring this up again and show you the difference of converting all of this into this little area here. This is why color management is so important and knowing what profiles you’re dealing with.

[5:41] Your safest bet is using the sRGB color space and converting into the coded GRACoL profile. Keep in mind that dealing with your print provider, they will produce, or they will provide the correct color profile based on their printing condition.

[5:58] A profile is a recipe, or the characteristics of a particular printing condition. Based on the press, the inks, and the paper that they use that will produce a profile.

[6:10] Well thanks again for tuning in. I hope this clears some things up. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment on the blog. And we will see you next time.

[6:21] Have a great day.[/learn_more]

 

Categories
Blog Color Management Video

VIDEO: Choosing CMYK Color Profile/Gamut Explained

There is no such thing as a universal CMYK.

The fact that an image is in CMYK does not mean the color will be correct for a printing press.

CMYK is a ‘device dependent’ color space, meaning that the CMYK data will print differently from one CMYK device to another. Every CMYK device has it’s own color profile. Knowing which CMYK color profile to convert to from RGB is very important to the success of color quality.

A CMYK printer profile is the characteristic or behavior of a printing condition or process.

Today we will demonstrate the differences between the GRACoL (general requirements for applications in commercial offset lithography) and SWOP (specification for web offset printing) CMYK color gamuts, or CMYK printer profiles. The GRACoL printing specification has a larger CMYK color gamut than the SWOP printing specification.

This VIDEO demonstration shows the GRACoL and SWOP CMYK color gamuts in a three-dimensional wireframe. The color wireframes are plotted in the LAB color space. Create an even larger CMYK color gamut by printing with FM/stochastic screening!

The LAB color space is ‘device indepedent’, meaning that LAB color data is absolute. LAB is a universal color space and is the best way to communicate the appearance of color.

Which color profile looks better to you? Please leave your comments below…

[learn_more caption=”Transcript of Video” state=”open”] Hi. This is Rick Rys from HiDefColor.com.

00:04 Today we’re going to talk about the CMYK color space and the two most common CMYK color printer profiles. It’s important to note that a color printer profile is the behavior or the characteristics of a printing condition. It’s important to note that when dealing with your commercial printer to ask them which color printer profile or which color specification they print to and use that profile. Here at HiDefColor.com, we support the GRACoL color specification.

00:40 The important thing to note is we’re going to be – you’re actually looking at CMYK color model is plotted in the LAB color space. The LAB color space is a three axis determination of what a color is going to be, so it’s absolute.

01:00 The first axis is the L channel or the lightness which goes from white to black. Now that is going from top to bottom and it’s also important to note that along this axis is where your grays are going to be; your gray balance here, fifty percent gray, seventy five, twenty five and so-on are going to be down the center of that axis.

01:22 The second axis, the A axis goes from a cyan/green over to magenta/red color and the B axis goes from blue to yellow. So within this area here is where we’re going to plot all of our colors.

01:38 We’re going to go from our lightest colors up here, to our darker colors down here. So in the center is where all your neutral colors are going to be. We’ll start with our first color printer profile, that will be the SWOP color printer profile.

01:51 When we turn that on, you can see we’ve generated a three-dimensional wire frame of that color model. You go from our paper-white, down to our shadows, and then across from our primary colors our reds, our blues, greens, to our subtractive primaries our yellow, cyan and magenta. And from the top down – looking straight down – you can see that we plotted the outside circumference of our color space, so you can see our color a little better, along with our three-dimensional wireframe.

02:27 The second option is the GRACoL color printer profile. Now, i’m going to bring that in. You will notice that when i click this on, that the GRACoL color printer profile completely engulfs the SWOP color printer profile.

02:41 Looking down here at the bottom – follow the cursor – you’ll notice from the top down the shadow, or the circumference, is much larger than the SWOP color gamut, meaning that you have more color that’s accessible when you convert from RGB to CMYK. You’re going to get a larger color gamut and this is displaying graphically what the larger color gamut is with the GRACoL color profile.

03:04 It’s important to note that you can’t just choose a profile. You have to understand what profile or what specifications your printer is running to. So if you convert to a SWOP profile and you’re printing GRACoL, there’s going to different results.

03:19 So again, what I want to do here is i’m going to change the opacity of the GRACoL so you can see better how much more color is available resulting in a larger color gamut.

03:31 We’ll get this spinning here so you can look around the different colors and look at the top down and also look at the wireframe to see how much more color. There’s more volume of color for you to work with to get a better reproduction in CMYK when you convert from RGB.[/learn_more]