What is a RIP – Raster Image Processor?

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What is a RIP – Raster Image Processor?

SHARE NOWWhat is a RIP? A simple analogy is Photoshop. Have you ever opened a PDF with Photoshop? The ‘Import PDF’ dialogue window prompts you with two important fields: resolution and mode. After inputting resolution, mode and clicking OK, Photoshop starts the raster image process – converting the PDF into a bitmap. Raster is another term for bitmap.     This is essentially what happens in prepress, however with much more sophisticated software and hardware. The main difference between the two is bit depth. Photoshop will convert a PDF file into an 8-bits/channel bitmap, while a high-end prepress RIP will convert the PDF file into a 1-bit/channel bitmap. 1 bit/channel is binary – on or off, black or white. 8-bits/channel is grayscale, meaning 28 =256 levels of gray – continuous tone. In Photoshop, a common resolution would be 300 pixels per inch. In prepress, resolutions can go as high as 5080 dots per inch rendering a printing plate. Note the difference between pixels and dots. Images are composed and displayed as pixels, while dots are what are used to render a printing plate. In essence, the RIP is the device that converts type, vector graphics, continuous tone images, screens and all other content into a high resolution grid of binary pixels that the laser will render onto a printing plate. Imagine a 5080 dots per inch grid at a size of 40″x30″ with various pixels turned on or off. This is a printing plate. Since a printing press cannot print continuous tone, these tiny little dots create the illusion of continuous tone. Stochastic printing-FM screening is responsible for creating the illusion of the 8-bit grayscale with only 1-bit binary imaging. Color Images are separated into CMYK and screened with stochastic-FM dots. Stochastic printing is far superior than conventional printing halftone dots because of their ability to render incredible detail. Raster Image Processors are now running Adobe PDF Print Engine 2 software replacing Postscript. That’s why PDFs are the standard for submitting files for press.   SHARE...

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VIDEO: Creating Perfect PDF Files for Press

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VIDEO: Creating Perfect PDF Files for Press

SHARE NOW This VIDEO tutorial will show you settings that will ensure print-ready PDF files for faster turnaround times and no output errors in prepress. Compression settings will ensure quick upload times to HiDefColor.com. This PDF workflow will also eliminate the need to convert any of your images to CMYK. No worries, these PDF settings for press will work just fine with images already converted to CMYK. Did you find this tip helpful? Please leave a comment below… Read Transcript of Video Hi. This is Rick Rys from HiDefColor.com 00:04 Today’s tutorial never convert to CMYK is a cool little export option out of indesign CS5 that will eliminate the need to ever convert to CMYK. 00:15 This cool little RGB workflow will eliminate a lot of disk space and save you a lot of time along with a lot of confusion regarding having two files of the same image. 00:27 You can see we have an image here that’s created in indesign CS5 it consists of an RGB bitmap image, you can see the color space is RGB, and it is tagged with the Adobe RGB color profile. 00:42 We also have a CMYK Adobe Illustrator image which is a vector graphic. 00:50 It’s important to note that the image is created with different values of gray. This is important because these color values of gray are built with black only and we want to make sure we do not re-separate this into a four color gray. 1:06 We also have a series of color swatches that are placed as pantone colors. Also, take note that we are using the LAB values of these colors. 1:21 So, once we are ready to go to press, we’re going to do a simple export option out of indesign CS5. 1:30 We’re going to utilize the Adobe PDF X-4 standard. Once we select PDF X-4, we’re going to save our file and we’ll go into the export Adobe PDF presets and select X-4; change the compatibility to PDF 1.7 standard; select our page and then go through the individual tabs here. 2:00 Under compression, we want to keep these values the same. Where we’re going to downsample to 300 pixels per inch when our image is greater than 450 pixels per inch. This will allow for a much faster upload to the color server at HiDefColor.com 2:18 Under marks and bleeds, two things – select our crop marks and change our bleed to .125″ top and bottom, inside and outside 2:29 The output tab is the most critical. This is where color conversion is going to take place and convert our images from RGB to CMYK. 2:39 We want to focus on the color conversion pull-down menu. We want to select “convert to destination” and “preserve numbers”. The preserve numbers will maintain any native CMYK data within the document. 2:53 This is...

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Number One Reason for Delays in Print Turnaround Time

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SHARE NOWThe number one reason your print order can be delayed is do to errors in producing print-ready files. All commercial printers are searching for the holy grail of PDF files; PDF X-3 , PDF X-4. A PDF X file is ready to RIP (raster image processing). The RIP is the computer/software that reads, interprets and renders your images onto printing plates. If there are issues with submitted files, the RIP will error out and the print job will be stopped. That’s when you receive the “phone call”. HiDefColor.com will be installing an AutoRIP feature online shortly. This will be a FREE, simple way to preflight your files before placing an order with us. Any errors will be noted so they can be repaired before you incur any charges for sending new files. SHARE...

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When RGB is not RGB

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SHARE NOWMany creatives may not realize that assigning a color profile can have a major impact on the quality of color reproduction. sRGB is a “virtual” color space designed for web publishing. Adobe RGB is another “virtual” color space intended for high-end color reproduction. The term “virtual” refers to a generalization of where a prospective monitor will display color. Some monitors will claim they can reproduce the whole Adobe RGB color gamut, while sRGB is known as the common denominator for monitors displaying websites. It is interesting to know that all web browsers display RGB values in the sRGB color space and HDTV is displayed in sRBG. This is the reason why rich colored images appear flat once they’ve been uploaded to a website. They are most likely tagged with an Adobe RGB profile. Look for continued posts on the differences, and impacts, of sRGB and Adobe RGB. SHARE...

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Vector Magic Bitmap Conversion Service

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SHARE NOWEvery once in awhile, a unique product/service will come along that just blows you away. Vector Magic is eerily good. How many times have you asked for a logo from your client and they provide a bitmap image (jpeg, png)? Vector Magic is a vector tracing service that will convert bitmap images into very clean vector graphics for printing on press. The resulting paths are incredibly clean and free of unnecessary anchor points that won’t cause concerns during prepress processing. Of course since they’re vector graphics, enlarging is no longer an issue. Try it out,  vectormagic.com/ SHARE...

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