Stochastic Printing vs. Conventional Printing

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Stochastic Printing vs. Conventional Printing

SHARE NOWFM, AM, XM, Hybrid, Staccato, Segundo, stochastic, conventional, 200 lpi, 175 lpi, 20 micron, 10 micron, first order, second order; what is the difference between stochastic printing vs. conventional printing? NOTE: Screening is the process after rasterizing PDF files in the RIP (raster image processor) during prepress. Halftone screening is done through software and creates very small dots, or cells, that are imaged onto a printing plate. The tiny dots create the illusion of continuous tone photographs when printed on press. Advantages of Stochastic Printing vs Conventional Printing Continuous tone photographic reproduction Produces a larger CMYK color gamut on press Renders greater detail Eliminates moire patterns Reduces ink consumption by as much as 10% – notice the ‘pooling’ of ink in conventional dot Produces smoother gradients More consistency in color throughout pressrun Faster ink drying Conventional screening (150 lpi, 175 lpi, 200 lpi) refers to AM screens, or amplitude modulation. This refers to halftone dots that are fixed on a grid, angled in 30 degree increments (except yellow: 15 degrees) and grow in size based on tonal value. LPI = lines per inch Stochastic screening (Staccato) refers to FM screens, or frequency modulation. This refers to micro-dots (20 micron, 10 micron) that are FIXED in size and tone values increase by adding more dots. The dots are rendered in a psuedo-random algorithm making them ideal for high definition details in photography and artwork. The micro-dots are rendered in a ‘weave’ to create very smooth tonal transitions. Micron =1/1,000,000 of a meter It’s important to note that stochastic printing produces a larger CMYK color gamut than AM screens. This occurs because light reflecting off the paper is filtered more efficiently, resulting in less ‘whiteness’ from the paper reflecting into the eye. Also, reprints are less likely because of the stability in controlling color on press. FM screens are much less likely to be impacted by ink density variations on press. The ink film on press is much thinner and less likely to be affected. Notice in the enlargement photo above the ‘pooling’ of ink in the conventional halftone dots. This causes the press to use more ink than is necessary. Have you ever seen printing with FM/stochastic screening? Please leave your comments below… (54 votes, average: 4.80 out of 5) Loading...     SHARE...

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VIDEO: Digital Dimensional Printing Files – RGB workflow

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VIDEO: Digital Dimensional Printing Files – RGB workflow

SHARE NOW This VIDEO tutorial will demonstrate how to create files in Adobe Photoshop CS for Digital Dimensional Printing. This tutorial will focus on the process of using an RGB workflow for Digital Dimensional Printing. Digital Dimensional Printing is a raised, high gloss, spot coating that is applied inline on our digital printing presses. Digital Dimensional Printing creates textures to your printed designs. Digital Dimensional Printing provides a very unique marketing advantage to your printed collateral. An RGB workflow will save you a lot of time while not having to convert your images to CMYK. Not only will you save time, not converting to CMYK, but you will not have multiple files of the same image, saving valuable disk space. These settings will ensure print-ready PDFs for faster turnaround times and no output errors in prepress; perfect for using online color printing. What are some of your ideas for dimensional printing? Please leave your comments below…   SHARE...

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VIDEO: Digital Dimensional Printing-Coating Files – CMYK workflow

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VIDEO: Digital Dimensional Printing-Coating Files – CMYK workflow

SHARE NOW Digital Dimensional Printing is a raised, high gloss, spot coating that is applied inline on our digital printing presses.  Digital Dimensional Printing creates textures to your printed designs. Digital Dimensional Printing provides a very unique marketing advantage to your printed collateral. These settings will ensure print-ready PDFs for faster turnaround times and no output errors in prepress. Have you ever felt printing like this before? Please leave a comment below… Transcript of Video Hi. This is Rick Rys from HiDefColor.com In today’s tutorial we are going to talk about preparing files for the new spot dimensional printing that is now available at HiDefCOlor.com 00:17 Spot dimensional printing is a raised high gloss spot coating/printing that’ll create a textured field to your printed projects. The spot dimensional coating/printing is available on our digital presses at HiDefColor.com 00:35 We are creating this image entirely within Photoshop CS. You can see we have our CMYK image of the football our logo and are type. We’ve also included all of our bleed in the actually image itself. 00:52 There is no reason to actually create extra work for yourself and create this image out of Indesign. We’re going to do the complete design and production out of Photoshop. 01:04 You can see right now we have our direct mail piece and the way the spot dimensional printing works, it works by creating a selection and the selection that you create is going to be textured or the raised high gloss coating. 01:23 Over here in our channels, you will notice that we have our cyan, magenta, yellow and black channels and I’ve already created a a selection called DIMENSIONAL and I’m going to isolate this DIMENSIONAL selection and show you the actual coating that’s going to be applied to the product. 01:45 So the areas that are in black are the areas that will have the spot dimensional coating. These will be the areas that will be raised and be in high gloss, so you can see we selected the actual dimples of the football. 01:57 This will give us the feel of the actual ball itself. It’s important to note that this DIMENSIONAL channel, the channel itself, has to be named as DIMENSIONAL and that this done through the channel options after selecting DIMENSIONAL. 02:15 Important to note that the word DIMENSIONAL needs to be typed in all caps. That is important when that file goes through the RIP in prepress, the DIMENSIONAL file will be extracted so that the actual DIMENSIONAL color plate can be created and printed on the fifth unit. 02:36 So once we create our dimensional file, name our file, we’re simply going to close this and go back to our image. For the sake of cosmetics, we’re going to turn our dimensional file off. It doesn’t matter if it’s selected or not. It’ll still be...

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Digital Printing vs Offset Printing: When to Choose and Why?

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Digital Printing vs Offset Printing: When to Choose and Why?

SHARE NOWThere are three main considerations in making a decision to use digital printing vs offset printing. Let’s discuss: Quality. There is little doubt that offset printing is better in terms of resolution. Photos, screen tints and gradient screens are far superior printed with a metal plate on an offset press. Contrary, a digital press will have a slightly larger color gamut due to the nature of the toner (digital ink) being fused to the substrate. This method of digital printing will provide brighter colors on uncoated stocks. Overall, the resolution and crispness of type/screens on an offset press far exceeds digital printing to the trained eye. See image above: offset printing dot (left) vs digital printing (right). Turnaround time. Hands down, digital printing is the choice. Without having to make expensive metal plates and time consuming ‘press makeready’, the ability of digital printing to output a single press sheet, without metal plates or ‘press makeready’, is a tremendous advantage. On the downside, the slower speed of a digital press makes longer runs more time consuming than an offset printing. Price. The major price difference between digital printing vs offset printing is the quantity. Lesser quantities will favor digital printing, while larger quantities will favor  offset printing. The ‘per unit’ price of a digital printed piece will be higher than offset. However, the expense of making plates and ‘press makeready’ with offset will cause the ‘per unit’ price to be linear – as the quantity goes up, the ‘per unit’ price goes down. Finding the price intersection is the key. As you can see, there are many variables to consider when comparing digital printing vs offset printing. There is no clear-cut decision. If quality is paramount, stick with offset and pay a little more. If you’re just looking for 50 brochures, digital printing is your choice. Another important aspect, when choosing between digital printing vs offset printing, is color consistency. Our printing company is certified to the G7 printing standard for color. This means we are able to obtain a visual match between different printing methods: digital, offset and inkjet. Color quality is no worry between printing devices. You can see the numbers yourself. HiDefColorPrint.com has an instant pricing calculator for both offset printing and digital printing. Use the instant pricing calculator to determine when to use digital printing vs offset printing.   SHARE...

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Gamut! Why Sky Blue Prints Purple On Press

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Gamut! Why Sky Blue Prints Purple On Press

SHARE NOW I’m sure everyone has seen it before: highly saturated digital photography (RGB image), however the sky blue prints purple on press. The resulting color is a product of the color gamut your commercial printer prints to or the profile of your inkjet printer. The rich, blue hue of the sky looks very surreal on screen because of a polarizing filter or just using a wide color gamut such as Adobe RGB. However, when these rich images get converted into a smaller CMYK color gamut, such as SWOP, the rich blue prints purple because those colors are not available in this particular CMYK gamut. A better solution is to work with a commercial printer that prints to a higher standard CMYK color gamut. HiDefColor.com prints to the GRACoL color standard, which contains more shades of blue for the rich RGB image to get converted into, especially Adobe RGB. Below is a comparison of the two CMYK color gamuts – SWOP and GRACoL: Always be aware you have choices when choosing a commercial printer. Has this happened to you? What did your printer tell you was the problem? Please leave your comments below…   SHARE...

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Secrets To Printing Chocolate

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Secrets To Printing Chocolate

SHARE NOWPrinting chocolate can be very demanding. The problem is a rich, appealing image of chocolate contains all four process colors and depending what profile is used, or converted to, there is a greater chance of not getting the results you’re looking for. An ICC color profile with a high percentage of GCR (gray component replacement) will produce the best results. Using GCR will lower the contaminate color (in the case of chocolate – cyan) and replace with a percentage of black ink. For instance, using Photoshop’s default North American General Purpose settings, a nice brown/chocolate color will produce CMYK values of 40 cyan, 75 magenta, 100 yellow and 40 black. HiDefColor.com uses an enhanced CMYK gamut and that same color would separate/convert as 15 cyan, 65 magenta, 95 yellow and 60 black. By just using the correct profile, a more controllable/predictable color would be obtained on press. Also, overall ink consumption would be reduced by nearly 10%. This is a result of adding the four process color percentages (255 versus 235), also know as Total Area Coverage (TAC). RGB-CMYK Values for Chocolate Brown: sRGB: 101, 61, 51 Adobe RGB: 92, 63, 54 GRACoL CMYK: 53, 77, 80, 36 SWOP CMYK: 43, 70, 71, 44 These values are for a midtone  chocolate brown. You can use these ratios for highlight and shadow values accordingly… Did this post help you? Leave a comment or rate this post below… (3 votes, average: 4.67 out of 5) Loading...       SHARE...

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Why My Color Doesn’t Match on Press, Part 1

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Why My Color Doesn’t Match on Press, Part 1

SHARE NOWHere are a few tips/methods to keep in mind when producing optimum color: 1. Consistent viewing conditions. The best source of light is our sun. In mid-afternoon, the sun’s light is perfectly balanced with equal parts of all colors creating a balanced light source. When viewing color proofs/press sheets inside, a 5000 Kelvin viewing box is required to communicate color effectively. Also referred to as D50 standard, it’s important that the area surrounding the viewing area be a neutral gray to limit outside color influence. Interesting to note, the North American standard is D50 (5000 Kelvin) and the ISO standard is D65 (6500 Kelvin) which is slightly cooler. Kelvin is a unit to describe light temperature. Warmer the temperature, cooler the color. 2. Metamerism. Have you ever been at work and look down to notice you’re wearing two different colored socks? Metamerism is the condition where two colors match under one viewing condition and do not match under another light source. Various lighting conditions range from incandescent light (light bulb), fluorescent (office) to daylight. A metameric match will occur under daylight conditions, and not match under incandescent light. It is imperative for everyone involved in color approval process to understand how the resulting color will be viewed to create the most effective colors. 3. Simultaneous Contrast. The surrounding environment while viewing a proof/press sheet can greatly effect the perception of a color. It is always recommended to view a proof/press sheet in a neutral environment. 4. It’s the paper. Subtractive color refers to using cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks on a white surround (usually paper) to reproduce full color. One component of the color reproduction process has the greatest influence on how good the color will look when printed on press: the paper. The same ink color will produce very different results when printed on various paper types. The whiter the paper is, the greater the color gamut that can be reproduced on press. As paper becomes less white (and less expensive), the color gamut that can be reproduced on press becomes smaller. First Indicator when viewing a proof that does not match press sheet. Most inkjet papers contain high levels of OBA (optical brightening agents) which create a”bluish”cast. The Paper appears whiter because there is less yellow in the light reflecting back to your eye. Yellow is the gray component of blue light, therefore adding yellow to blue light will make it more neutral. Read Part 2 Here SHARE...

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Number One Reason for Reprinting a Print Order

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SHARE NOWAccording to a recent survey from GATF (Graphics Arts Technical Foundation), the number one reason for printers’ reprints was due to unacceptable color in print. There has been a general lack of communication, and knowledge, in the print industry that’s been the main cause. Surprisingly, there are many printers that do not have color profiles for their printing conditions. These printers should be avoided due to the lack of being able to produce consistent color off their press. SHARE...

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